This is an archived course. Visit the most recent syllabus.

Course Description

A survey of nine contemporary media institutions including their technical, economic, social, political and cultural implications. We will also examine the social and individual effects of these media, the policies that govern them, and their role in globalization.

Format

This is an asynchronous online course run on this site and on Google Classroom.

Google Classroom requires a QC CAMS account, an active QC G Suite for Education account, and an enrollment code that I will provide via email. Read these instructions for joining Google Classroom.

This course consists of twelve sessions on contemporary media. For each session, there will be…

  • a short pre-recorded lecture, about twenty minutes in length, that you will listen to at the time of your choosing.
  • assigned readings from the required textbook
  • a quiz on the material you just covered.

After covering four sessions, there will be an essay exam on the material you covered.

Although the course is asynchronous, you must complete each assignment by the deadline specified on this syllabus and on Google Classroom.

Instructor

Juan Monroy

Textbook

You may get the textbook from the following sources:

The textbook is also available on reserve at Rosenthal Library.

Review Materials

Under each class, I will post on this site the following review materials:

Use these materials to prepare for the midterm and final exams.

Blackboard

We will not be using Blackboard for this course. Instead, consult the Course Website for the syllabus and Google Classroom for submitting assignments.

G Suite for Education

This course will use G Suite for Education using your QC CAMS (often referred to as the QC Active Directory) account. Below are instructions for how to activate your QC G Suite for Education account (titled “Step 1” below) and how to join our course on Google Classroom (titled “Step 2” below). New QC students and students enrolled at another CUNY campus will have to take an additional, first step (titled “Step 0” below).

About Google accounts

You can have more than one Google account. If you use Gmail, you already have a Google Account: it is likely a personal Google account. Google offers organizations, businesses and educational institutions G Suite accounts for its users. Since you’re enrolled at Queens College, you have access to a QC G Suite for Education account.

You cannot access QC G Suite for Education using your personal Gmail or another G Suite account.

You can be logged into both accounts at the same time, but you will likely have to switch between accounts to access your QC G Suite for Education account versus your personal G Suite.

Step 0: Activate your QC Username

Students New to Queens College, Recently Transferred to QC, or Enrolled at another CUNY Campus.

You must first activate your Queens College username and email account at https://cams.qc.cuny.edu.

The process takes about three (3) business days so please start this process as soon as possible.

Step 1: Activate Your QC G Suite for Education account

Information Technology at Queens College offers detailed instructions for activating (or claiming) your QC G Suite for Education account. The process comes down to four steps.

  1. Go to https://gdrive.qc.cuny.edu/.
  2. Log in with your complete Queens College username (e.g., jmonroy100@qc.cuny.edu).
  3. From the QC authentication page, sign in with your QC CAMS account. Use your QC CAMS username (e.g. jmonroy100) and your QC CAMS password. (If you’re having trouble contact the QC CAMS Help Desk at 718–997–4444.)
  4. Accept the terms of service.

You can access your QC G Suite for Education account at https://google.com/a/qc.cuny.edu.

Your Google G Suite for Education username is [Your QC AD username]@qc.cuny.edu, for example, jmonroy100@qc.cuny.edu.

About Google Classroom

Google Classroom is a barebones, learning management system that you will use to submit your assignments and I will use to grade your work. We will not be using Blackboard.

I will also post announcements to Google Classroom instead of emailing everyone in class. However, you should use email to contact me, instead of the private commenting system in Google Classroom because it doesn’t work properly.

Step 2: Join Google Classroom

Google has instructions for joining a course in Google Classroom. The process basically comes down to four steps:

  1. Go to Google Classroom.
  2. Sign in using your QC CAMS login.
  3. Click the “+” to “Join class.”
  4. Enter the code I provided at the first meeting (for face-to-face classes) or via email (for online classes).

I highly recommend downloading the Google Classroom mobile app for iOS or Android. If you allow push notifications, you will immediately receive important announcements from me and learn when assignments are posted.

Use the QC G Suite for Education Apps

We will be using some QC G Suite applications in this class.

  • Google Docs is a cloud-based, word-processing application. It is comparable to Microsoft Word on your personal computer except that all your documents are stored in your Google Drive. Be sure you’re using your QC G Suite account, not your personal Google account. Download the Google Docs mobile apps for iOS or Android.
  • Google Meet is a video-based, communication platform used for remote office hours. Download the Google Meet mobile apps for iOS or Android.
  • Google Forms is a survey and data collection platform that we will use for quizzes in some courses. There’s a bug in Forms that requires you to authenticate using your QC G Suite account on a web browser if you navigate to the quiz from the Google Classroom apps. To avoid this bug, I recommend taking the quizzes on a desktop computer.
  • Google Drive is a cloud-based file storage platform. Your QC Google Drive offers unlimited storage, compared to 15 GB with your personal Google Drive. Download the Google Drive mobile apps for iOS or Android.

Troubleshooting

A majority of access issues can be resolved switching to your Queens College Google account. This article describes how to switch between Google accounts.

Another resolution that always works is to log out of all your Google accounts in your web browser and then logging back into your QC G Suite account at https://google.com/a/qc.cuny.edu.

Policies

Attendance

For in-person classes, regular attendance is required. Attend twelve or more classes and receive five bonus points added to your final grade. Students missing more than four classes will not be permitted to take the final exam.

For hybrid course, regular attendance is required. Attend seven or more classes and receive five bonus points added to your final grade. Students missing more than three classes will not be permitted to take the final exam.

This policy does not apply to online courses.

Verification of Attendance

You must be present or participating in class during the verification of attendance period. Otherwise, I will report you as not attending and you will be dropped from the class.

The verification period is as follows:

  • fall and spring semesters: the first three weeks of classes
  • summer and winter semesters: the first two days of classes

Academically-related activities include, but are not limited to:

  • physically attending a class where there is an opportunity for direct interaction between the instructor and students;
  • submitting an academic assignment;
  • taking an exam, an interactive tutorial, or computer-assisted instruction;
  • attending a study group that is assigned by the school;
  • participating in an online discussion about academic matter;
  • engaging in an online academically-related activity, or initiating contact with the instructor to ask a question about the academic subject studied in the course or ask a course-related question.

Note: Logging into an online class is not sufficient, by itself, to demonstrate participation in an academically-related activity by the student.

Professionalism

Digital devices are prohibited in in-person classes. Unfortunately, students in the past have failed to use computers, tablets, smartphones, etc. in a professional, responsible, or productive manner, and, as such, you are not allowed to use these devices in class after the first class session.

You’re welcome to print out the slides ahead of time—they are available on this website—and to take notes on paper. I recommend buying a spiral notebook, some nice pencils, and a portable pencil sharpener to do this.

Further, if I find you engaging in any other disruptive behavior, such as passing notes, instant messaging, chatting, photographing, or texting, I will remove you from the classroom and have you withdraw from the class.

Late Work

Please submit your work on time. Late quizzes and take-home final exams will not be accepted. In some cases, assignments due at the end of the term will not be accepted. In-class exams must be taken at the date and time listed below unless other we make other arrangements.

All other work will be penalized as follows:

Fall and Spring Courses
After a 24-hour grace period, late work will be penalized by a 10% reduction for each 24-hour period it is late. After one calendar week, the assignment will not be accepted, and you will likely fail this class.
Summer and Winter Courses
After a one-hour grace period, late work will be penalized by a 10% reduction up to 24 hours after the deadline. Late work will not be accepted after 24 hours.
All courses
No work will be accepted after the last class session.

“Incomplete” Grades

There are no incomplete grades for this class except in the case of a documented emergency in the final weeks of the semester. If you experience such an emergency, please contact me immediately, and we will work out a schedule for you to complete the outstanding work before the beginning of the following semester.

But aside from these circumstances, no late work will be accepted and no “incomplete” grades will be granted. If you have difficulty keeping up with coursework, consider giving yourself extra time to complete assignments, reducing your overall course load, and/or taking this class at a later semester.

No Extra Credit Assignments

There are no opportunities for extra credit. As a matter of fairness, your grade will be based on the work assigned to all students.

Email

Do not use the commenting system in Google Classroom to communicate with me.

Always use your QC email account (student@qmail.cuny.edu) to email me, and also direct all emails to my jmonroy@qc.cuny.edu account. This is the only way I can communicate with you, other than face-to-face meetings or via video conferencing.

CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity

The CUNY Policy on Academic Integrity, as adopted by the Board, is available to all students. Academic dishonesty is prohibited in the City University of New York and is punishable by penalties, including failing grades, suspension, and expulsion.

Use of Student Work

All programs in New York State undergo periodic reviews by accreditation agencies. For these purposes, samples of student work are occasionally made available to those professionals conducting the review. Anonymity is assured under these circumstances. If you do not wish to have your work made available for these purposes, please let the professor know before the start of the second class. Your cooperation is greatly appreciated.

Course Evaluations

During the final four weeks of the semester, you will be asked to complete an evaluation for this course by filling out an online questionnaire. Please remember to participate in these course evaluations. Your comments are highly valued, and these evaluations are an important service to fellow students and to the institution, since your responses will be pooled with those of other students and made available online, in the Queens College Course Information System. Please also note that all responses are completely anonymous; no identifying information is retained once the evaluation has been submitted.

Campus Resources

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities needing academic accommodation should register with and provide documentation to the Office of Special Services, Frese Hall, room 111. The Office of Special Services will provide a letter for you to bring to your instructor indicating the need for accommodation and the nature of it. This should be done during the first week of class. For more information about services available to Queens College students, contact the Office of Special Services (718–997–5870) or visit their website http://sl.qc.cuny.edu/oss/.

Technical Support

The Queens College Helpdesk, (718) 997–4444, helpdesk@qc.cuny.edu) is located in the I-Building, Room 151 and provides technical support for students who need help with Queens College email, CUNY portal, Blackboard, and CUNYfirst.

Help with Writing

One of the most important skills you will learn throughout your education is writing. If you cannot write, you will not succeed at communicating your ideas and will endanger your professional development.

The Writing Center at Queens College offers free assistance to students with writing. Please visit the center at least once for each writing assignment you have for your classes this semester. You can schedule a one-hour session or drop in to consult an on-duty tutor.

Quizzes

After auditioning each recorded lecture and reading the relevant chapters from the textbooks, you will take a quiz. Each quiz consists of about ten-to-twenty questions—a mix of true-false and multiple-choice. The quiz will be available online as a Google Form.

Note the quiz deadlines. No late quizzes will be accepted.

Ten of twelve quizzes are required and constitute 40% of your final grade.

Exams

There will be three exams. Each exam will consist of five identification questions and five short answer questions that you will submit on Google Classroom by the due date listed below.

  1. Exam 1, due January 10
  2. Exam 2, due January 17
  3. Exam 3, due January 24

All three exams are required and constitute 60% of your final grade.

Schedule

As this course is asynchronous, the dates on this schedule are suggested dates of completion. However, the due dates for each assignment—including quizzes and exams—are firm and must be completed on-time in order to receive credit.

January 3 • Welcome

  1. Watch the video: Welcome to Contemporary Media, Winter 2017
  2. Buy the required textbook: Media Now, 9th ed.
  3. Activate your QC G Suite for Education account
  4. Join the class on Google Classroom
  5. Complete the Welcome Survey to ensure you’ve successfully activated your G Suite for Education account and joined our Google Classroom.

January 4 • Contemporary Media

Contemporary Media signals a dramatic shift from mass media to more narrowly targeted “new media” that is made possible by technological changes (digitalization) and cultural changes (the rise of information society).

Assignments
  • Read
    • Media Now, Chapter 1, “Changing Media”
    • Media Now, Chapter 2, “Media and Society”
  • Audition the recorded lecture: Contemporary Media
  • Complete Quiz 1 by 11:59 PM (EST) today
Review

January 5 • Books and Magazines

The emergence of mass print in the nineteenth century ushered in an age of books and magazines, but new competition from other media has changed how books and magazines survive in a post-print age and how they continue to circulate ideas.

Assignments
  • Read Media Now, Chapter 3, “Books and Magazines”
  • Audition the recorded lecture: Books and Magazines
  • Complete Quiz 2 by 11:59 (EST) today
Review

January 6 • Newspapers

Once a means to deliver news to the public, newspapers were synonymous with the print media that carried the news. However, recent technological and cultural changes have made newspapers find new ways to reach its audience beyond the same print product for everyone.

Assignments
  • Read Media Now, Chapter 4, “Print to Digital Newspapers”
  • Audition the recorded lecture: Newspapers
  • Complete Quiz 3 by 11:59 (EST) today
Review

January 9 • Recorded Music and Radio

Radio and recorded music have evolved together since the beginning of the 20th century and have adapted to recent technological challenges by specializing its content and moving to new, different platforms.

Assignments
  • Read
    • Media Now, Chapter 5, “Recorded Music”
    • Media Now, Chapter 6, “Radio”
  • Audition the recorded lecture: Recorded Music and Radio
  • Complete Quiz 4 by 11:59 (EST) today
Review

January 10 • Exam 1

Exam 1 is due today by 11:59 PM EST on Google Classroom.

January 11 • Film and Home Video

The film industry has evolved from a tightly controlled vertically integration studio system to one that today requires a variety of different and segmented ways to reach an audience.

Assignments
  • Read Media Now, Chapter 7, “Film and Home Video”
  • Audition the recorded lecture: Film and Home Video
  • Complete Quiz 5 by 11:59 (EST) today
Review

January 12 • Television

Once dominated by the former radio networks, television in the United States has evolved to new programming forms, new platforms, and facing new competition as your primary screen.

Assignments
  • Read Media Now, Chapter 8, “Television”
  • Audition the recorded lecture: Television
  • Complete Quiz 6 by 11:59 (EST) today
Review

January 13 • Internet

The rise of interoperable networks and personal computers since the 1960s made possible the emergence of the Internet in the 1990s and the digital revolution in contemporary media.

Assignments
  • Read Media Now, Chapter 9, “Internet”
  • Audition the recorded lecture: Internet
  • Complete Quiz 7 by 11:59 (EST) today
Review

January 16 • Persuasion Industries

Emerging during the industrial revolution, advertising and public relations emerged as ways to direct messages to consumers and the public through the media. In the digital age, the media may have changed but the messages have persisted.

Assignments
  • Read
    • Media Now, Chapter 10, “Public Relations”
    • Media Now, Chapter 11, “Advertising”
  • Audition the recorded lecture: Persuasion Industries
  • Complete Quiz 8 by 11:59 (EST) today
Review

January 17 • Exam 2

Exam 2 is due today by 11:59 PM EST on Google Classroom.

January 18 • Video Games and the Third Screen

The telephone has converged into the smartphone and the third screen—the movies and TV being the first two. As a carrier for binary data, the phone is now a bona fide computer connected not just to the telephone network but also the Internet. Video games represent media convergence, consisting of many other media and a born-digital form.

Assignments
  • Read
    • Media Now, Chapter 12, “Third Screen: Smart Phones and Tablets”
    • Media Now, Chapter 13, "Video Games
  • Audition the recorded lecture: Video Games and the Third Screen
  • Complete Quiz 9 by 11:59 (EST) today
Review

January 19 • Media Effects, Impacts, and Uses

As media ingratiate themselves into our lives, we study how media effects the cognitions, emotions, and behavior of individuals and the impact it has on social behavior, the environment, and the economy.

Assignments
Review

January 20 • Media Policy and Regulation

Contemporary media are subject to governmental policies and regulations intended to curb their influence, ensuring universal access, and protecting consumers.

Assignments
Review

January 23 • Media and Globalization

Contemporary media and information networks are crucial for globalization, an accelerating process of integrating communication, culture, trade, and governance among people across the world.

Assignments
  • Read Media Now, Chapter 17, “Global Communications Media”
  • Audition the recorded lecture: Media and Globalization
  • Complete Quiz 12 by 11:59 (EST) today
Review

January 24 • Exam 3

Exam 3 is due today by 11:59 PM on Google Classroom.